Holly Lynch MP

Working hard for the people of Halifax, Illingworth & Mixenden, Town, Ovenden, Park, Skircoat, Northowram & Shelf, Sowerby Bridge and Warley

Home

Recent Activity

Mr Speaker, this will be the hardest speech I will ever give, however it wasn’t difficult to write, as there was just so much that I wanted to say.

Jo Cox, the honourable member for Batley and Spen was the very best of us.

She may have been small, but she packed a political punch, which was simply, beyond measure.

She came into this place with such passion and energy. From the very start, she had a clarity about what she was here to achieve, about what needed to change, and she wasn’t going to waste any time in getting on with it. She knew that the people counting on her, couldn’t afford to wait.

Her experiences of working in some of the most dangerous places in the world, caring for some of the most desperately vulnerable, upholding the principles of justice and basic human rights, were reflected in both her politics, and her character. It meant that when she spoke, people listened. There was a weight to what she had to say, she wasn’t afraid to say it, and she had a vision of a world, better than the one which has taken her from us.

She would work characteristically across the benches to build support for change, in the most collegiate of ways, which has been reflected in the tributes paid to her.

When the new 2015 intake of Labour MPs arrived in Westminster in May of last year, I remember our then acting leader, the right honourable member for Camberwell and Peckham telling us, that ‘Every day you are an MP, is a day that you can make a difference.’ 

Nobody embodied that sentiment, more than Jo.

With friends and colleagues, she would speak candidly about the challenges of balancing a young family, with the pressures of being a diligent and effective member of Parliament.

I was both Jo’s friend, and Jo’s whip, which should have been a difficult balance to strike, but it wasn’t.

That’s not to say that she was the easiest person to whip, as she just knew that certain late night votes were just not as important as being there to put her children to bed and tuck them in.

Jo managed to reconcile being both, a hero, of our movement, with being incredibly down to earth. You only had to hear Jo speak to know that her roots were firmly in Batley and Spen. She was a daughter of Yorkshire and she fought tirelessly for those who had put their faith in her.  

I, like all of us, will remember Jo in many different ways. She spoke of her predecessor Dr Broughton in her maiden speech, alluding to the fact that he had been credited with bringing down a Government, and she put the front bench opposite on notice with a smile that we all came to know and love. Whilst they laughed it off at the time, I wouldn’t be at all surprised if they hadn’t become increasingly nervous once, they began to realise just how formidable she really was.

But I’ll also remember Jo, in the voting lobbies in her gym kit leaving us all wondering, really, where did she find the energy. I’ll remember hearing the trials and tribulations of the kids recently having chicken pox.

I will remember regional news following her as a newly elected MP, and capturing the moment when one of the kids lost a shoe to the Thames, that Jo had to try and retrieve, all before starting the day.  

I will remember her warmth, her spirit, and her laugh.

And those of us from my intake who had the pleasure of her company as she hosted an event to mark our first year in office on Tuesday of last week, will be eternally grateful for those treasured memories and the chance to all be together one last time.

The honourable member for Redcar, told me that she will remember Jo as a comet. Burning brightly, lighting up the dark. Awe inspiring and giving off sparks of heat, light and positive energy wherever it goes, and I cannot think of a better way of describing her.

Mr Speaker, Jo was the heart and soul of these benches and we are heartbroken. We loved her every day and we will miss her every day. She inspired us all and I swear that we will do everything in our power, to make her and her family proud. 

Holly's speech in tribute to Jo Cox

Mr Speaker, this will be the hardest speech I will ever give, however it wasn’t difficult to write, as there was just so much that I wanted to say. Jo...

Holly_Lynch_Calderdale_College1.jpg

New figures released this week show that Calderdale has benefited from tens of millions of pounds of EU funding over recent years. The analysis has been published by the Stronger IN campaign and has been welcomed by remain campaigners as evidence of the benefits of EU membership.

Among the projects which have benefitted have been the Hebden Bridge Creative Quarter which received over £1.2 million from the European Regional Development Fund for the rebuilding of the Town Hall by world-class architects Bauman Lyons.

Calderdale College has seen over £30 million of investment from the EU which has helped to improve their provision of in work training opportunities and get more people into well paid employment.

The investment has mainly been delivered by the European Social Fund which was set up with the aim to improve employment opportunities and help raise standards of living. Its funding aims to help equip the workforce with the skills needed by business in a competitive global economy to improve job prospects.

Across Yorkshire there are a wide range of projects which benefit from EU funding. For example the EU gave £370,000 to repair damaged river walls and restore and preserve the Fountains Abbey ruins in the high altar. In total during the 2007-2013 European Structural Funds programme, Yorkshire and the Humber received £640m.

Halifax MP Holly Lynch, who is campaigning for Britain to remain in the EU, commented:

“Many people have told me during this referendum campaign that they are desperate to see some facts on the local benefits of our EU membership. These figures show that while Britain makes a contribution to the EU we get plenty back in return.

“As well as the benefits of access to Europe’s free trade single market of 500 million consumers EU membership brings increased investment to places like Calderdale College and helps provide opportunities for the next generation.”

Extent of EU investment in Halifax revealed

New figures released this week show that Calderdale has benefited from tens of millions of pounds of EU funding over recent years. The analysis has been published by the Stronger...

Holly_Lynch_MP_Westminster.png

 

The Government’s decision to deny under 25s the National Living Wage came under increased scrutiny yesterday as MPs debated the issue for the first time in Parliament.

 

From last month under 25s on low wage jobs began to earn less per hour than their older colleagues even those who are working in the same role. There is currently a 50p per hour difference in the minimum rate for those over 25 years of age and those younger than 25 and The Low Pay Commission predict that this will rise to a difference of £1.21 per hour by October 2020.

 

The debate, organised by Holly Lynch MP, saw Minister of State for Skills Nick Boles respond to criticisms that under 25s are being unfairly excluded from the National Living Wage rates.

 

The Conservatives have been repeatedly criticised for their labelling of young workers as unproductive. However in a written response to Holly before the debate Mr Boles conceded that “there are no official statistics estimating the productivity of workers by their age.”

 

Opposition MPs argued against the exclusion of young workers from the National ‘Living Wage’, criticising the fact that even young workers with years of experience in a role could be on a lower rate than a newly hired employee over 25.

 

Labour’s Shadow Minister for Equalities Cat Smith claimed that under 25s face many of the same costs as older workers saying:

 

“I have never met a landlord who is willing to rent out a property for less money to someone who is under 25, or a baker who is willing to sell a loaf of bread for less because the person wanting to eat it is under 25. It costs us all the same to live.”

 

Speaking after the debate Holly, who has launched a campaign to reverse the decision, said:

 

“As one of Parliament’s youngest MPs I have spent my first year in the role with a growing sense of anger at the way in which the government treats people of my generation.

 

“It’s outrageous that under 25s are being told that they aren’t worth £7.20 an hour.

 

“Millions of hard working young people across the country face being paid less than their older colleagues, regardless of experience.”

 

“The Government need to act now to secure a fair wage for young workers and I’ll be working with young people and colleagues in Westminster to build pressure on the Government to rethink this unjust decision.”

 

To read Holly's full speech click here.

MPs debate 'outrageous' denial of National Living Wage to Under 25s

  The Government’s decision to deny under 25s the National Living Wage came under increased scrutiny yesterday as MPs debated the issue for the first time in Parliament.   From...


View More Activities

The Labour Party will place cookies on your computer to help us make this website better.

Please read this to review the updates about which cookies we use and what information we collect on our site.

To find out more about these cookies, see our privacy notice. Use of this site confirms your acceptance of these cookies.